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By Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, PA
March 15, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Podiatrist   Foot Doctor  

Dr. Michael Frank, Dr. Marc Goldberg, and Dr. Adam Lowy of Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland are dedicated to helping you take the best care of your feet. With locations in Olney, MD, Camp Springs/Clinton, MD, Silver Spring, MD, and Kensington, MD, our podiatrists are here for you when your feet need care.

What is a podiatrist?

Podiatrists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of foot and ankle problems. They have received years of specialized training in the lower extremities. Your foot doctor in Kensington, MD, treats foot problems like corns, calluses, bunions, hammertoes, and ingrown toenails.

Podiatrists also treat sprains and fractures of the foot, ankle, and heel by performing surgeries and prescribing therapies for patients. Podiatrists can also outfit patients with custom orthotics, or shoe inserts that help correct various foot and gait problems. A good foot doctor is an important resource if you have certain conditions or injuries.

Why is it important to have a foot doctor?

Having a foot doctor is very important if you have any conditions or lifestyle habits that affect your feet. For example:

  • Diabetes
  • Sports Injuries
  • Congenital foot deformities (hammertoes, flat feet, bunions)
  • Soft tissue injuries (like Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis)
  • Arthritis
  • Gait problems (due to injury, deformity, or aging)

A podiatrist can be an important lifeline when you have any of these conditions or if you have an injury to a lower extremity.

If you've never seen a podiatrist before, your initial visit will consist of a discussion about your medical history and a thorough examination. Depending on the issues you need to treat a podiatrist can prescribe therapies, orthotics, and even lifestyle changes to improve your foot health. Let us help you put your best foot forward!

Dr. Michael Frank, Dr. Marc Goldberg, and Dr. Adam Lowy are here for you at Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland. Contact us in Olney, MD, at (301) 924-5044, Camp Springs, MD, at (301) 868-7670, Silver Spring, MD, at (301) 439-0300, and Kensington, MD, at (301) 942-8110.

By Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, PA
March 10, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Hammertoes  

Do you have a painful hammertoe? Your Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, podiatrists at Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland can recommend a few strategies and treatments that will help relieve pain and stiffness.

What you can do about your hammertoe at home

A hammertoe occurs when your toe becomes bent at a right angle. At first, you'll be able to straighten your toe by pressing on it. If you don't treat your condition, your toe may eventually become rigid. You can improve your comfort and keep your toe flexible by:

  • Changing Your Footwear: Wearing shoes that are too tight can irritate your hammertoe. Look for low-heeled shoes that have plenty of room in the toe area, or if the weather's warm, switch to sandals and open-toed shoes.
  • Pad Your Hammertoe: Painful corns and calluses can form on the top of your toe if it rubs against your shoes. Applying pads to your hammertoe will reduce friction and pain.
  • Exercise Your Toe: Toe exercises help keep your hammertoe flexible. Exercises can be as simple as picking up small objects with your toes or scrunching a towel between your toes.
  • Take Anti-Inflammatory Medication: Over-the-counter anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen and naproxen sodium decrease both pain and inflammation. Ice packs can also reduce pain and inflammation.

How your podiatrist can help you

It's a good idea to visit your Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, foot doctors if home treatments don't help or if your toe has become rigid. Your podiatrist may recommend one or more of these treatment options:

  • Padding and Taping: Padding and taping your toe reduces pain and improves the position of your toe.
  • Cortisone Injections: Injections can ease pain and inflammation if over-the-counter medications aren't helpful.
  • Orthotics: Orthotics are prescription shoe inserts that cushion your foot, redistribute your weight, and may even prevent your condition from worsening.
  • Surgery: If other treatments aren't helpful, surgery may be needed to straighten your toe.

Are you struggling with a painful hammertoe? Schedule an appointment with your podiatrists in Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD. Get in touch with Family Foot and Ankle Associates in Maryland by calling (301) 924-5044 for the Olney office, (301) 868-7670 for the Camp Springs office, (301) 439-0300 for the Silver Spring office, or (301) 942-8110 for the Kensington office.

By Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, PA
March 09, 2021
Category: Foot Care

Does your foot or ankle arthritis ever stop you from doing the things you want to do? Your Clinton, MD, podiatrists at Family Foot and Ankle Associates offer treatments that will ease your pain and make walking easier. Their offices are conveniently located in Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD.

What are the signs and symptoms of foot and ankle arthritis?

Arthritis symptoms may vary depending on whether you have osteoarthritis, post-traumatic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is due to wear and tear, while post-traumatic arthritis occurs as a result of an injury. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that attacks the joints.

Signs and symptoms of arthritis in your foot or ankle may include:

  • Pain: Pain may increase when you move or exercise. You may notice that your pain is worse in the morning or after you've been resting for a while.
  • Tenderness Over the Joint: You may notice pain or soreness when you press on the joint.
  • Redness: The skin over the joint may feel warm and look red.
  • Swelling: Arthritic foot or ankle joints may become stiff and swollen, which can make walking and standing difficult or painful.

What you can do to relieve your arthritis symptoms

Over-the-counter anti-inflammatories, like ibuprofen and naproxen sodium, may reduce pain and swelling. Ice also decreases pain and inflammation, while heat can reduce stiffness.

Although running a marathon might not be the best idea if you have foot or ankle arthritis, low-impact exercise, like swimming, cycling, or water aerobics, may help you manage your pain and keep your foot or ankle flexible.

If your pain doesn't improve, or you have trouble walking or standing, schedule an appointment at the Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, podiatry offices. Your foot doctor can offer you a variety of treatments that may be helpful, including:

  • Prescription pain relievers
  • Prescription medications that prevent your immune system from attacking your joints if you have rheumatoid arthritis
  • Corticosteroid injections to relieve pain and inflammation
  • Physical therapy to reduce stress on joints, decrease stiffness and strengthen the muscles that support your joints
  • Braces that support your ankle and improve mobility
  • Orthotics, prescription shoe inserts that support your foot and decrease pressure
  • Surgery to remove inflamed tissues and loose cartilage, remove bone spurs, or fuse bones in the joint

Improve your arthritis pain with a visit to your podiatrist in Clinton, MD! Make your appointment with the doctors at Family Foot and Ankle Associates by calling (301) 924-5044 for the Olney office, (301) 868-7670 for the Camp Springs office, (301) 439-0300 for the Silver Spring office, or (301) 942-8110 for the Kensington office.

By Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, PA
March 05, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Ingrown toenails  

Ingrown toenails are fairly common, affecting almost 20 percent of adults at some point in their lives, according to the National Foot Health Assessment. If you happen to develop a stubborn ingrown nail, your Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, podiatrists. Dr. Michael Frank, Dr. Marc Goldberg, and Dr. Adam Lowy of Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, offer helpful treatments.

What causes ingrown toenails?

Ingrown toenails occur when the edge of a nail grows into the soft skin surrounding the nail. As the nail continues to grow into the skin, your toe may begin to hurt and look red and swollen. In some cases, an ingrown toenail can become infected. If you have an infection, you may notice pus and red streaks on your toe, in addition to worsening pain.

What to do if you have an ingrown toenail

When the nail first begins to pierce the skin, it may be possible to free it by soaking your foot in warm water and Epsom salt for 10 or 15 minutes, then lifting the nail by placing a piece of dental floss or cotton under it. Soak the foot and replace the cotton or floss every day until the nail is no longer trapped. Don't try to force the nail if it won't budge, and don't try to free a trapped nail yourself if you have diabetes.

Get in touch with your Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, if:

  • You notice signs of infection.
  • Your nail is firmly embedded in the skin.
  • You have severe pain.
  • You frequently experience ingrown toenails.

Your podiatrist can numb your toe with a local anesthetic and perform a minor procedure to remove the trapped section of the nail. When a nail becomes ingrown often, removing the entire nail may be helpful. If you have an infection, your podiatrist may also prescribe an antibiotic.

How to avoid ingrown toenails

You can reduce your risk of developing an ingrown toenail by:

  • Cutting your toenails straight across rather than rounding the edges
  • Not wearing tight shoes or socks
  • Treating toenail fungus promptly

Do you have an ingrown toenail? Schedule an appointment with your podiatrists in Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, Dr. Michael Frank, Dr. Marc Goldberg, and Dr. Adam Lowy of Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland. You can reach the foot doctors by calling (301) 924-5044 for the Olney office, (301) 868-7670 for the Camp Springs/Clinton office, (301) 439-0300 for the Silver Spring offices, or (301) 942-8110 for the Kensington office.

By Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland, PA
March 04, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Heel Pain  

It's hard to fix a problem if you don't know what's causing it, whether the issue is a strange noise in your car's engine or heel pain. Fortunately, your Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, podiatrists, Dr. Marc Goldberg, Dr. Michael Frank, and Dr. Adam Lowy of Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland can get to the bottom of your pain and offer treatments that will help you feel better.

4 common causes of heel pain

Heel pain can be caused by:

  • A Stone Bruise: The fat pad under your heel can become bruised if you step on a hard object or work out wearing shoes that don't provide enough cushioning. Stone bruises usually go away on their own, although adding a heel cup to your shoe can be helpful while your bruise heals.
  • Plantar Fasciitis: One of the most common causes of heel pain, plantar fasciitis occurs when a band of connective tissue underneath your foot becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis pain is usually worse in the morning or after you've been relaxing for a while. Your podiatrist can offer several treatment options, such as a night splint, physical therapy, orthotics (prescription shoe inserts), corticosteroid injections, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy.
  • Heel spurs: Heel spurs are calcium deposits that develop on the bottom of your heel. They can occur if you've had plantar fasciitis, but may also be caused by wearing shoes that don't fit well, running on hard surfaces, excess weight, or a gait issue. Treatment for heel spurs includes orthotics, pain relievers, corticosteroid injections, physical therapy, or night splints.
  • Achilles tendonitis: An inflammation in the thin tendon at the back of your heel may also be responsible for your pain. If your inflammation is mild, buying anti-inflammatories at an Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington store can be helpful, as can stretching exercises, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections, heel wedges and cups, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Surgery may be recommended if your pain doesn't improve after six or months of treatment.

Are you struggling with heel pain? Dr. Marc Goldberg, Dr. Michael Frank, and Dr. Adam Lowy, your podiatrists in Olney, Camp Springs/Clinton, Silver Spring, and Kensington, MD, can ease your pain. Schedule an appointment with one of the foot doctors at Family Foot and Ankle Associates of Maryland by calling (301) 924-5044 for the Olney office, (301) 868-7670 for the Camp Springs/Clinton office, (301) 439-0300 for the Silver Spring offices, or (301) 942-8110 for the Kensington office.





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